News Bulletin

04.04.14

World Cup fever is spreading and we’ve got examples of several brands who are on the ball. We’re also looking at Cadbury’s darker guise for India. All that and more in this week’s news…

COGS OF INDUSTRY

The venues may not be ready for the World Cup, but FIFA fever is already sweeping the world of marketing. Limited edition packs, from the likes of Budweiser, Taittinger (official champagne of the World Cup 2014) and Coca-Cola are hitting the shelves. For Coca-Cola, this year’s World Cup marketing push will be the largest campaign of its 128-year history ­– a massive landmark for the brand. We’re excited to see how it plays out. Bring on Brasil!

‘Copo’-Cola

LETTER FROM AMERICA

A recent study has found that characters on cereal boxes are often designed to make eye contact with their intended target audience – gazing downwards on children’s cereal (as seen here with Trix cereal), versus looking straight ahead on adult cereal. Interestingly, when eye contact was made, brand trust and loyalty increased ­­– suggesting that this approach is a powerful (yet somewhat sinister?) marketing tool.

Eye of the (Tony) tiger
Eye of the (Tony) tiger

PRETTY PACKAGING

Known for their trademark Pantone 2685c, Cadbury reveal a darker side with the redesign of their Bourneville pack in India. In a bid to appeal to the country’s growing middle classes, the brand has adopted a more premium visual language – combining dark colourways with high-quality photography. Black not only works as a recognisable premium cue (signalling a shift in positioning), but also successfully communicates the product’s increased cocoa content.

Cadbury reveal a darker side
Cadbury reveal a darker side

AND FINALLY

How many times do you stop to appreciate the impact good design has in day-to-day life? We’re all guilty of forgetting design’s influence on even the smallest things, and this short film endearingly reminds us why design is so important. The film is purely visual, featuring no language or narration, so that (like good design) it can be universally understood.

http://vimeo.com/90208216


NAME THAT BRAND

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